Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Courage and Determination


Robinson Crusoe’s parents want him to become a lawyer but Crusoe is
determined to become a sailor. He leaves home without his parents
’blessing and works hard to become a good sailor.
He shows great courage when he escapes from his Turkish master.
He ensures he has guns and food before he escapes.
When he is shipwrecked on a deserted island, Crusoe overcomes great
obstacles to survive. He struggles alone in order to carry food, equipment
and other materials from the ship so that he can make a life for himself until
he is rescued. He builds two homes, a raft and a canoe. He is also able to
make tools and plant enough food for himself and his companions.
He shows great courage when he saves Friday, Friday’s father, the Spaniard
and the second English sea captain. He does all this
at the risk of being captured and eaten by the cannibals!



Importance of Hard Work

It is important to work hard as this makes you disciplined and successful
in life. Robinson Crusoe is a good example of a man who is fearless,
positive and hard-working. Instead of complaining about his fate,
he looks at the situation and does what is needed to make the situation
better. For example, he salvages useful items from the sinking ship,
makes a canoe and safe shelters for himself, and hunt for food.
He creates a comfortable life for himself and is able to survive on
the island for twenty-eight years.


Friendship and Loyalty

Humans need friendship and good relationships with others.
When Crusoe runs away to London, he makes friends with
a ship’s captain who grows to like and trust him. He teaches
Crusoe mathematics and navigation until Crusoe becomes a good sailor.
Crusoe is a friendly and sociable person. The captain invites
Crusoe to go with him to Guinea, thus starting Crusoe’s involvement
in business and sailing. Crusoe also makes many friends while farming in Brazil.
When Crusoe gets shipwrecked on the island, he is desolate
and miserable. Deprived of human company, he finds comfort
and companionship with two dogs he rescues from the shipwreck,
the parrot and the cats.
During his twenty-fifth year on the island, he manages to
save a savage from a group of cannibals who land on the island.
This man is so grateful that he wants to be Crusoe’s slave.
However, Crusoe prefers him to be a friend. Crusoe teaches
him to eat animal flesh, speak English and share his religious beliefs.
Friday, as Crusoe calls him, becomes his faithful companion and friend.
Crusoe also becomes a friend to the Spanish and English mutineers
who were left on the island. He solves their disputes
and helps them to form friendships with each other.



Relationship with Nature

Humans are part of Nature and, therefore, should live and work
harmony with Nature. Crusoe is a man at peace with Nature.
He loves the sea and the outdoors. So when he is marooned
on the island and finds himself alone with only Nature
as his companion, he adapts easily.
He is quick to use things from Nature to help him survive.
He uses the trees and plants to build himself a canoe and
homes, ant to provide him with food.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Leopard vs. Poodle Joke

Posted in Animal Jokes

A wealthy old lady decides to go on a photo safari in Africa, taking her poodle along for company.

One day the poodle starts chasing butterflies and before long, discovers that he’s lost. Wandering about, he notices a hungry-looking leopard heading rapidly in his direction.

The poodle thinks, “Oh, oh!” Noticing some bones on the ground close by, he immediately settles down to chew on the bones with his back to the approaching cat. Just as the leopard is about to leap, the poodle exclaims loudly, “Boy, that was one delicious leopard! I wonder if there are any more around here?”

Hearing this, the leopard halts his attack in mid-strike, a look of terror comes over him and he slinks away into the trees. “Whew!”, says the leopard, “That was close! That poodle nearly had me!”

Meanwhile, a monkey who had been watching the whole scene from a nearby tree, figures he can put this knowledge to good use and trade it for protection from the leopard. So off he goes, but the poodle sees him heading after the leopard with great speed, and figures that something must be up. The monkey soon catches up with the leopard, spills the beans and strikes a deal for himself with the leopard.

The leopard is furious at being made a fool of and says, “Here, monkey, hop on my back so you can watch me chew that poodle to bits!”

Now, the poodle sees the leopard coming with the monkey on his back and thinks, “What am I going to do now?”, but instead of running, the dog sits down with his back to his attackers, pretending he hasn’t seen them yet, and waits until they get just close enough to hear.

“Where’s that damn monkey?” the poodle says, “I sent him off an hour ago to bring me another leopard!”

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

analogy

in biology, similarity of function and superficial resemblance of structures that have different origins. For example, the wings of a fly, a moth, and a bird are analogous because they developed independently as adaptations to a common function-flying. The presence of the analogous structure, in this case the wing, does not reflect evolutionary closeness among the organisms that possess it. Analogy is one aspect of evolutionary biology and is distinct from homology (q.v.), the similarity of structures as a result of similar embryonic origin and development, considered strong evidence of common descent.

antonyms

–noun
a word opposite in meaning to another. Fast is an antonym of slow.Compare synonym

idioms
an expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meanings of its constituent elements, as kick the bucket or hang one's head, or from the general grammatical rules of a language, as the table round for the round table, and that is not a constituent of a larger expression of like characteristics.

imperatives

–adjective
1.absolutely necessary or required; unavoidable: It is imperative that we leave.
2.of the nature of or expressing a command; commanding.
3.Grammar. noting or pertaining to the mood of the verb used in commands, requests, etc., as in Listen! Go!Compare indicative (def. 2), subjunctive (def. 1).
–noun
4.a command.
5.something that demands attention or action; an unavoidable obligation or requirement; necessity: It is an imperative that we help defend friendly nations.
6.Grammar.
a.the imperative mood.
b.a verb in this mood.
7.an obligatory statement, principle, or the like.

synonyms

–noun
1.a word having the same or nearly the same meaning as another in the language, as joyful, elated, glad.
2.a word or expression accepted as another name for something, as Arcadia for pastoral simplicity; metonym.
3.Biology. one of two or more scientific names applied to a single taxon.

adjectives
–noun
1.
Grammar. any member of a class of words that in many languages are distinguished in form, as partly in English by having comparative and superlative endings, or by functioning as modifiers of nouns, as good, wise, perfect.
–adjective
2.
pertaining to or functioning as an adjective; adjectival: the adjective use of a noun.
3.
not able to stand alone; dependent.
4.
Law. concerning methods of enforcement of legal rights, as pleading and practice (opposed to substantive).
5.
(of dye colors) requiring a mordant or the like to render them permanent (opposed to substantive).

Monday, May 3, 2010

Friday, March 26, 2010

WATER (ORAL)

Assalamualaikum and very good morning. Here, I wants to tell about water.
Water is necessary to life. Without water, all living things will surely die. We need water for drinking, cooking, and many more.
No one can survive without drinking water. Everyday we drink litres of water. This sometimes takes the form of soft drinks and soups.
Farmers use water to cultivate the fields and to provide drinking water for their livestock.
Dams are built across rivers not only to generate hydro-electricity but also to create reservoirs where water is stored to provide for drinking and irrigation.
Since water is so important , we should use it wisely and not waste it or pollute our rivers , lakes and sea.
Thanks you......

Monday, March 1, 2010

R obinson Crusoe is an Englishman from the town of York in the seventeenth century, the youngest son of a merchant of German origin. Encouraged by his father to study law, Crusoe expresses his wish to go to sea instead. His family is against Crusoe going out to sea, and his father explains that it is better to seek a modest, secure life for oneself. Initially, Robinson is committed to obeying his father, but he eventually succumbs to temptation and embarks on a ship bound for London with a friend. When a storm causes the near deaths of Crusoe and his friend, the friend is dissuaded from sea travel, but Crusoe still goes on to set himself up as merchant on a ship leaving London. This trip is financially successful, and Crusoe plans another, leaving his early profits in the care of a friendly widow. The second voyage does not prove as fortunate: the ship is seized by Moorish pirates, and Crusoe is enslaved to a potentate in the North African town of Sallee. While on a fishing expedition, he and a slave boy break free and sail down the African coast. A kindly Portuguese captain picks them up, buys the slave boy from Crusoe, and takes Crusoe to Brazil. In Brazil, Crusoe establishes himself as a plantation owner and soon becomes successful. Eager for slave labor and its economic advantages, he embarks on a slave-gathering expedition to West Africa but ends up shipwrecked off of the coast of Trinidad.

Crusoe soon learns he is the sole survivor of the expedition and seeks shelter and food for himself. He returns to the wreck’s remains twelve times to salvage guns, powder, food, and other items. Onshore, he finds goats he can graze for meat and builds himself a shelter. He erects a cross that he inscribes with the date of his arrival, September 1, 1659, and makes a notch every day in order never to lose track of time. He also keeps a journal of his household activities, noting his attempts to make candles, his lucky discovery of sprouting grain, and his construction of a cellar, among other events. In June 1660, he falls ill and hallucinates that an angel visits, warning him to repent. Drinking tobacco-steeped rum, Crusoe experiences a religious illumination and realizes that God has delivered him from his earlier sins. After recovering, Crusoe makes a survey of the area and discovers he is on an island. He finds a pleasant valley abounding in grapes, where he builds a shady retreat. Crusoe begins to feel more optimistic about being on the island, describing himself as its “king.” He trains a pet parrot, takes a goat as a pet, and develops skills in basket weaving, bread making, and pottery. He cuts down an enormous cedar tree and builds a huge canoe from its trunk, but he discovers that he cannot move it to the sea. After building a smaller boat, he rows around the island but nearly perishes when swept away by a powerful current. Reaching shore, he hears his parrot calling his name and is thankful for being saved once again. He spends several years in peace.
One day Crusoe is shocked to discover a man’s footprint on the beach. He first assumes the footprint is the devil’s, then decides it must belong to one of the cannibals said to live in the region. Terrified, he arms himself and remains on the lookout for cannibals. He also builds an underground cellar in which to herd his goats at night and devises a way to cook underground. One evening he hears gunshots, and the next day he is able to see a ship wrecked on his coast. It is empty when he arrives on the scene to investigate. Crusoe once again thanks Providence for having been saved. Soon afterward, Crusoe discovers that the shore has been strewn with human carnage, apparently the remains of a cannibal feast. He is alarmed and continues to be vigilant. Later Crusoe catches sight of thirty cannibals heading for shore with their victims. One of the victims is killed. Another one, waiting to be slaughtered, suddenly breaks free and runs toward Crusoe’s dwelling. Crusoe protects him, killing one of the pursuers and injuring the other, whom the victim finally kills. Well-armed, Crusoe defeats most of the cannibals onshore. The victim vows total submission to Crusoe in gratitude for his liberation. Crusoe names him Friday, to commemorate the day on which his life was saved, and takes him as his servant.
Finding Friday cheerful and intelligent, Crusoe teaches him some English words and some elementary Christian concepts. Friday, in turn, explains that the cannibals are divided into distinct nations and that they only eat their enemies. Friday also informs Crusoe that the cannibals saved the men from the shipwreck Crusoe witnessed earlier, and that those men, Spaniards, are living nearby. Friday expresses a longing to return to his people, and Crusoe is upset at the prospect of losing Friday. Crusoe then entertains the idea of making contact with the Spaniards, and Friday admits that he would rather die than lose Crusoe. The two build a boat to visit the cannibals’ land together. Before they have a chance to leave, they are surprised by the arrival of twenty-one cannibals in canoes. The cannibals are holding three victims, one of whom is in European dress. Friday and Crusoe kill most of the cannibals and release the European, a Spaniard. Friday is overjoyed to discover that another of the rescued victims is his father. The four men return to Crusoe’s dwelling for food and rest. Crusoe prepares to welcome them into his community permanently. He sends Friday’s father and the Spaniard out in a canoe to explore the nearby land.
Eight days later, the sight of an approaching English ship alarms Friday. Crusoe is suspicious. Friday and Crusoe watch as eleven men take three captives onshore in a boat. Nine of the men explore the land, leaving two to guard the captives. Friday and Crusoe overpower these men and release the captives, one of whom is the captain of the ship, which has been taken in a mutiny. Shouting to the remaining mutineers from different points, Friday and Crusoe confuse and tire the men by making them run from place to place. Eventually they confront the mutineers, telling them that all may escape with their lives except the ringleader. The men surrender. Crusoe and the captain pretend that the island is an imperial territory and that the governor has spared their lives in order to send them all to England to face justice. Keeping five men as hostages, Crusoe sends the other men out to seize the ship. When the ship is brought in, Crusoe nearly faints.
On December 19, 1686, Crusoe boards the ship to return to England. There, he finds his family is deceased except for two sisters. His widow friend has kept Crusoe’s money safe, and after traveling to Lisbon, Crusoe learns from the Portuguese captain that his plantations in Brazil have been highly profitable. He arranges to sell his Brazilian lands. Wary of sea travel, Crusoe attempts to return to England by land but is threatened by bad weather and wild animals in northern Spain. Finally arriving back in England, Crusoe receives word that the sale of his plantations has been completed and that he has made a considerable fortune. After donating a portion to the widow and his sisters, Crusoe is restless and considers returning to Brazil, but he is dissuaded by the thought that he would have to become Catholic. He marries, and his wife dies. Crusoe finally departs for the East Indies as a trader in 1694. He revisits his island, finding that the Spaniards are governing it well and that it has become a prosperous colony.